Dental TI Technology Minute

Tips for CBCT Positioning

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 8, 2016 3:49:37 PM / by Dental Technology Team posted in Training, Troubleshooting, CBCT, Cone Beam

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You have a new CBCT machine in your office and you are excited. You want to get the most out of it, which means you need to know how to position your patients. If you properly position your patients, your machine will take clear images that will help you with everything from diagnosis and treatment to undergoing complex procedures. Fortunately, there are a few tips you can follow that will make this process extremely simple. Once you follow these tips, you will be well on your way to getting the most out of your CBCT machine.

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10 Ways to Protect your Costly Dental Sensor Investment

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 28, 2016 3:17:01 PM / by David Hanning posted in Intraoral Sensors, Troubleshooting, Dental Technology, dental sensors

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One of the most frustrating aspects to digital x-ray technology is having a sensor fail outside of warranty.  Most manufacturers will state that the average life of a sensor is three to five years with normal wear and tear.  This is true regardless if you use the SuniRay2, UniRay 1.5, QuickRay, EI, XDR, Schick CDR or 33, Dexis Platinum, etc. However, many dental offices have experienced failures before the average life expectancy. The following are tips to help your office get the most life from your sensor.

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Comprehensive CBCT Training is Crucial, Here's Why

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 22, 2016 1:25:18 PM / by David Hanning posted in Training, Troubleshooting, CBCT, 3D Imaging, Cone Beam, Dental Technology

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Interest in CBCT technology in dental has grown substantially as more general dentists place implants and recognize the value of virtually planning the procedure for the best treatment results. There is no substitution for being able to accurately measure bone level and thickness prior to placing an implant.

Most CBCT software allows for the virtual placement of the implant so that the exact best placement can be determined prior to the actual procedure. The peace of mind that this kind of precision offers helps dentists placing implants avoid sleepless nights wondering about the success of difficult procedures. Buccal perforations and angulation errors become a thing of the past with a properly used CBCT scan.

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3 Tips for Getting Diagnostic Quality from Your Intraoral Cameras

[fa icon="calendar'] Mar 1, 2016 11:11:49 PM / by David Hanning posted in Training, Troubleshooting, Intraoral Cameras

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Most dental practices use intraoral cameras to increase patients’ awareness and acceptance of various treatments. In addition, many dentists use these cameras to diagnose issues. In order for this to work, the images must be crisp and clear. Fortunately, there are some tips you can follow to get diagnostic-quality images from intraoral cameras. These tips are easy to follow, so you can implement them immediately.

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5 CBCT Troubleshooting Tips

[fa icon="calendar'] Mar 1, 2016 2:01:06 PM / by David Hanning posted in Training, Troubleshooting, CBCT

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CBCT scanners play a big role in dental offices around the world. They have the power to take between 150 to 600 x-rays a minute, providing dentists with the information needed to diagnose and treat patients. Sometimes, though, these machines do not work as they should. When that is the case, you can go through some CBCT troubleshooting tips. These tips will help you get your CBCT machine up and running again.

Tip 1: Shadow on 3D Flat Panel

Shadows are a common problem when you’re using CBCT scanners. Shadows make it difficult to diagnostic problems, and they can even make it look as if there are additional objects on the x-ray.

If you notice a shadow on your x-rays, check the position of the chair and the head supports that the patient used. If the chair isn’t lowered, the head support rods will get in the way of the x-ray machine. That will cause the shadow. Reposition the chair and have the patient take the x-ray again.

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