Dental TI Technology Minute

3 Factors to Ensure Quality X-Ray Images

[fa icon="calendar'] Feb 12, 2018 3:37:37 PM / by David Hanning posted in Intraoral Sensors, Training, Dental Technology, dental sensors, Dental TI

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

Many practices report that they experience very different image quality from their sensors than they had seen at a trade show or on a manufacturer's website before they purchased. The reality is that there are many factors which affect the quality of the image returned from your intraoral sensors. Luckily, you and your staff can optimize image quality by following these three steps, none of which are particularly difficult.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

Spend Less Time Selling, More Time Treating

[fa icon="calendar'] Jan 23, 2018 1:31:31 PM / by Luke Scott posted in Training, Intraoral Cameras, Dental Technology, Dental TI

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

A simple imaging protocol tweak to maximize the value of your time.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

Varying Slice Thickness: A Practical Example of CBCT for Endo

[fa icon="calendar'] Nov 21, 2017 11:04:27 AM / by David Hanning posted in Training, CBCT, 3D Imaging, Cone Beam, Dental Technology, Dental TI

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

Last week during a CBCT training on the Prexion Excelsior Pro,  I came across a great example of the benefit of varying slice thickness in CBCT software. CBCT volumes show 3 different 2D perspectives (axial, sagittal, and coronal) of the same location. Because a CBCT volume is a composite of many "slices" in the same plane, CBCT x-ray allows the user to vary the thickness from a single voxel slice to a composite view of multiple slices in the same plane. A digital PA will look similar to a composite view of many slices. 

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

CBCT 201 - What is slice thickness and how varying it offers a different view

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 21, 2017 10:35:12 AM / by David Hanning posted in Training, CBCT, 3D Imaging, Cone Beam, Dental Technology, Dental TI

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

Understanding how to vary slice thickness and why and when you  want to do that. I realized that for those that are new to CBCT the concept of slice thickness is foreign and needs further explanation.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

Making your technology an investment

[fa icon="calendar'] May 24, 2017 12:28:43 PM / by David Hanning posted in Intraoral Sensors, Training, CBCT, 3D Imaging, Intraoral Cameras

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

Many Dental offices consider themselves to be “digital” offices. They have incorporated computers at
the front desk and in the treatment rooms and have software that manages their practice
and electronic images – both camera and radiographic. The dentists with such offices have invested
time, money, and often times have endured a good amount of frustration to get there. In addition,
many high- tech offices are under utilizing their systems and only deriving a fraction of the benefit that
could be garnered with the correct “vision of utilization” and “proper training” to achieve it.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

Creating a Surgical Guide with your CBCT

[fa icon="calendar'] Mar 17, 2017 11:48:01 AM / by David Hanning posted in Training, CBCT, 3D Imaging, Cone Beam, Dental Technology, 179 Tax Deduction

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments


 

Implant dentistry was once left to periodontists,  and prosthodontists. Today, a growing number of general dentists are also placing implants. With the proper education, a general dentist can add thousands of dollars of revenue every month by adding implants to the office procedures.  One tool that is key to making the process more certain and predictable is CBCT technology. With a CBCT scanner it is possible to create a surgical guide even in heavily restored cases. Today we will illustrate the process of using the J.Morita R100 CBCT scanner to scan a heavily restored patient with a scan appliance. The scan appliance allows for the alignment of the CBCT (Dicom infoormation) information and the digital model  (STL file) that is created   and use BlueSky Bio software to use the CBCT information in designing and printing a surgical guide for implant placement. 

A primary challenge of using CBCT for implant planning is managing image scatter due to restorations. Scatter appears as rays of distortion as the x-ray photons do not penetrate radiopaque restorations and instead reflect at the surface.  This can make it difficult for the software to match the CBCT information (subginigival info) with an intraoral model(scanned or stone). At Dental TI, we have created and educate on a protocol that provides accurate surgical guides, even on heavily restored patients. With the J.Morita R100 CBCT unit, a surgical table, and a scan appliance, and using  BlueSky Bio software, you have the full technology package to plan and create surgical guides and place implants with dramatically improved accuracy and success. 

One of Dental TI's clients , Esteban Velez DDS, who practices in Avon Indiana, shares a case below where he used his J.Morita R100 and a scan appliance to create a surgical guide. The detailed steps of the case and corresponding images are below.  


Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

Tips for CBCT Positioning

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 8, 2016 3:49:37 PM / by Dental Technology Team posted in Training, Troubleshooting, CBCT, Cone Beam

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

You have a new CBCT machine in your office and you are excited. You want to get the most out of it, which means you need to know how to position your patients. If you properly position your patients, your machine will take clear images that will help you with everything from diagnosis and treatment to undergoing complex procedures. Fortunately, there are a few tips you can follow that will make this process extremely simple. Once you follow these tips, you will be well on your way to getting the most out of your CBCT machine.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

Comprehensive CBCT Training is Crucial, Here's Why

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 22, 2016 1:25:18 PM / by David Hanning posted in Training, Troubleshooting, CBCT, 3D Imaging, Cone Beam, Dental Technology

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

Interest in CBCT technology in dental has grown substantially as more general dentists place implants and recognize the value of virtually planning the procedure for the best treatment results. There is no substitution for being able to accurately measure bone level and thickness prior to placing an implant.

Most CBCT software allows for the virtual placement of the implant so that the exact best placement can be determined prior to the actual procedure. The peace of mind that this kind of precision offers helps dentists placing implants avoid sleepless nights wondering about the success of difficult procedures. Buccal perforations and angulation errors become a thing of the past with a properly used CBCT scan.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

3 Tips for Getting Diagnostic Quality from Your Intraoral Cameras

[fa icon="calendar'] Mar 1, 2016 11:11:49 PM / by David Hanning posted in Training, Troubleshooting, Intraoral Cameras

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments


Most dental practices use intraoral cameras to increase patients’ awareness and acceptance of various treatments. In addition, many dentists use these cameras to diagnose issues. In order for this to work, the images must be crisp and clear. Fortunately, there are some tips you can follow to get diagnostic-quality images from intraoral cameras. These tips are easy to follow, so you can implement them immediately.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

5 CBCT Troubleshooting Tips

[fa icon="calendar'] Mar 1, 2016 2:01:06 PM / by David Hanning posted in Training, Troubleshooting, CBCT

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments


CBCT scanners play a big role in dental offices around the world. They have the power to take between 150 to 600 x-rays a minute, providing dentists with the information needed to diagnose and treat patients. Sometimes, though, these machines do not work as they should. When that is the case, you can go through some CBCT troubleshooting tips. These tips will help you get your CBCT machine up and running again.

Tip 1: Shadow on 3D Flat Panel

Shadows are a common problem when you’re using CBCT scanners. Shadows make it difficult to diagnostic problems, and they can even make it look as if there are additional objects on the x-ray.

If you notice a shadow on your x-rays, check the position of the chair and the head supports that the patient used. If the chair isn’t lowered, the head support rods will get in the way of the x-ray machine. That will cause the shadow. Reposition the chair and have the patient take the x-ray again.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]