Dental TI Technology Minute

10 Ways to Protect your Costly Dental Sensor Investment

[fa icon="calendar'] Jul 28, 2016 3:17:01 PM / by David Hanning posted in Intraoral Sensors, Troubleshooting, Dental Technology, dental sensors

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One of the most frustrating aspects to digital x-ray technology is having a sensor fail outside of warranty.  Most manufacturers will state that the average life of a sensor is three to five years with normal wear and tear.  This is true regardless if you use the SuniRay2, UniRay 1.5, QuickRay, EI, XDR, Schick CDR or 33, Dexis Platinum, etc. However, many dental offices have experienced failures before the average life expectancy. The following are tips to help your office get the most life from your sensor.

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Dental Sensor Comparison-Get the Facts and Don't Believe the Hype!

[fa icon="calendar'] Jun 7, 2016 11:54:31 AM / by David Hanning posted in Intraoral Sensors, Dental Technology, dental sensors

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There are a lot of claims about digital x-ray quality with some companies claiming that they have the best image quality. In this particular study soon to be graduates from the University of St. Louis'
Endodontic Program compared 6 sensors to see how much difference there really is among sensors. A pig jaw was used and a #6 file was inserted in a canal to be x-rayed.  Each sensor was exposed using the same position and an exposure level that was deemed ideal for that sensor. The results are in the image below. The first group is "native" or unenhanced while the second group has been sharpened.  The sensors evaluated were: Dexis Platinum, Poloroid Sensor, Quickray, SuniRay2, XDR. 

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The Truth About Digital Dental Sensors

[fa icon="calendar'] Apr 1, 2016 1:30:00 PM / by David Hanning posted in dental sensors

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Digital Dental Sensors: The top things to know when buying them

There is a lot of confusion regarding intraoral digital dental sensors technology. We thought it would be helpful to educate doctors on dental sensors in the market.

Sensor Design
All current generation sensors use the same general components in an assembly that is essentially a sandwich. The components that make up the “sandwich” are: 1) Scintillator (the best are CSi cesium iodide) this converts the x­ray photons to light that the sensor can recognize. 2) FOP – fiber optic plate – This filters the light and directs it to the sensor 3) CMOS sensor – its pixels are aligned in a grid to absorb the light according to the density of the substance that the photons are penetrating. 4) Analog to digital convertor which converts the pixel well information to digital information that the computer translates into an x­ray. 

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